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A Splendid Christmas

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SplendidChristmas.com is a great site to present to those close to you because it provides a very subtle Christmas witness.

Send a family member to it and they will find Christmas carols with free Christmas song sheets, the story of the First Christmas, Christmas cookie recipes, crafts and Christmas music. Then there is a link for a gospel presentation, but it’s not called a Gospel presentation….

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Click here, take a look, and send the link to the one you love.

This is another wonderfully creative web effort from my friend Anna (Banana) Jackson, who with her husband Dale, run a great evangelistic web store called Evangelism Stuff!

13 Comments

  1. Ah, Christmas! That time of year when even good Christians can’t resist the pull of paganism.

    • I am not concerned so much about the “War on Christmas.” I understand that in this multi-cultural society that many people don’t celebrate Christmas. That’s why my Gospel tracts wish people “Happy Holidays.” I do remind people, though, of its true meaning.

      While my family doesn’t do the birthday cake thing, I don’t mind that others do.

  2. Sad, but true, perdita.

    When Christians lose sight of the real meaning of the Season, our Savior’s birth, and focus on the things of this world only—shopping, gifts, family, friends, (all good things)—it truly is a tragedy.

    And let’s put this pagan thing to rest. Please. Any time I/we/Christians have an opportunity to co-opt a pagan holiday and bring attention to God, thus redeeming the time, it’s a good thing.

    No, Christ was not born on Christmas Day. But a great holiday that points to Christ, a holiday that a great part of the (pagan) world celebrates, was born! Hallelujah!

    The pagan part of this season is now largely forgotten, except of course, by a few cynics and unbelievers. But Christ is exalted!

    Heck, even the most hardened atheist can sing a hymn of worship to my Lord when caught off guard and finds him/herself mouthing the tunes of Christian carols!

    Go tell it on the mountain!

    (Note: Any further declarations that we celebrate a pagan holiday will be answered by a link to this comment. In other words, we all know that this holiday came from pagan origins. It is the Christian way to sanctify and redeem the unholy.)

  3. Not a prob! Like Thanksgiving, this is another holiday that has evolved over time.

    Do I take it you don’t participate in the whole ‘war on Christmas’ and the ‘Jesus’s Birthday’ thing?

    I think there’s a big difference in taking a day to celebrate God giving a savior to the world and making a birthday cake with ‘Jesus’ iced on the top. The later is quite pagan, even if the name is ‘Jesus’.

  4. So it’s okay that people have forgotten the origins of Thanksgiving then?

    You seem selective in your history.

  5. “I do remind people, though, of its true meaning.”

    True meaning? You just contradicted yourself. Remember, it’s a pagan holiday that you co-opted. 🙂

    However, since we agree that holidays evolve, I won’t tell you you’re wrong in how you celebrate Christmas and Thanksgiving and the meaning you give them, if you won’t tell me I’m wrong in how I celebrate Christmas and Thanksgiving and the meaning I give them. Agree?

    On a serious note, Easter really is the defining holy day of your religion. Christmas – not so much.

  6. The issue is not so much “Is Christ in Christmas?”. The issue is “Is Christ in YOU?”.

  7. The issue is not so much “Is Christ in Christmas?”. The issue is “Is Christ in YOU?”.

    Is that yours? I know I’m a heathen and all that, but that’s pretty good.

  8. Yes, Perdita

    I was open air preaching last week before the start of a Santa Parade in downtown Ottawa and it wasn’t until right after I said that did I realize what I just said. Things like that happen sometimes when God is at work in people.

    Thanks…and may I be one of the first to wish you a Merry Christmas? 🙂

  9. Gotta agree with perdita; that was a good one, Paul.

  10. Thank you, Paul! Merry Christmas to you, too.

  11. Thanks, Nohm. I give God the credit. And Merry Christmas to you, as well, albeit still quite early for all that stuff.

    As a matter of fact, quite late really, as Jesus was probably born in and around the beginning of September if we consider the Jewish feasts and festivals that were going on around the time of the Savior’s birth.

    Whatever!:)

  12. “As a matter of fact, quite late really, as Jesus was probably born in and around the beginning of September if we consider the Jewish feasts and festivals that were going on around the time of the Savior’s birth.”

    From what I read, establishing a ‘birth’ celebration was very controversial for the early Christians. This was something that pagans did and they wanted the Church to remain separate and pure. Others thought the best way to deal with the festival would be to take it over – and, like Steve said, use it to glorify their God. I imagine the clean and unclean food controversy would play in this.

    One of the reasons “Jesus is the reason for the season” irks me is because it shows ignorance of all this.

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